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What is Going On?

Have you noticed that people are walking around in what seems to be a fog? They are either staring down at their phone or just daydreaming as they cross the street or walk in parking lots. They don’t look around for cars, traffic lights or other people.

The other day I turned into a parking lot to do a little shopping and there was a young girl walking in the middle of the traffic area oblivious to cars that may want to park, after all, it is a PARKING LOT, not her backyard.

I didn’t want to honk and scare her so I drove slowly following behind her. She turned around and I put my right hand up as if to say, “what are you doing?” This is a New York, Italian-ish gesture; a non-verbal communication thing. I parked my car, and just as I’m about to enter the store, this young, 22-ish girl appeared in front of me. As a side note: I was dressed very professional and she had on some nondescript black pants and top, no tats, no rings, no make-up. I would say a nice looking person, until she literally got in my face and opened her mouth with extremely colorful, threatening expletives. She just kept going on and on about how dare I do this and do that. Yes, I was shocked and appalled at how this young person could treat an adult her grandmother’s age, like this. It didn’t even occur to me that she could have punched me or, worse yet, stabbed or shot me. She might have been on drugs or just plain angry because of some such thing, and wanted to vent at someone.

I can rant about the lack of respect and the unwarranted cursing, but at the end of the day, I can’t do anything about it. She is who she is, and until she hurts someone, she will go on her merry way spewing her poor attitude to anyone who gets in her way.

This is not an isolated case of displaced anger with an attitude. Unfortunately, it’s all over the news, happening in every city, state and country. Having mandatory anger management classes in elementary and high school might help to eliminate some of the erratic behavior that is becoming way too common in today’s society.  And, then again, nothing might help.  It’s too late for time out in the corner.

 

3 Comments on this Post

  1. You should carry a taser and shocked some sense into her:)

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  2. Do you remember a year or two ago when a PR professional in Scottsdale reached back to smack her kids in the back seat, veered across several lanes of traffic and killed a bicyclist? Lives lost and lives shattered because she felt she had to discipline them that second. It happens more and more, from phone/text distractions to whatever they think is SO much more important than paying attention while on the road, walking, etc. Selfishness and carelessness know no bounds–not of age, status, or generation.

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  3. You’ve hit upon my #1 pet peeve! But for me, the saddest part of it all is the alarming disconnect, from their environment and surroundings – for the moment, let’s forget about the extremely dangerous situation they expose themselves and more unfortunately other to (ok, so maybe I didn’t forget!). When I was working in NYC and go out to grab lunch or whatever, I’d usually come back with some little innocuous or amusing tidbit to tell my coworkers. One day, one of them said to me, “why are you the one these things happen in front of?” My reply – I’m not not glued to my phone, I actually see it! Stop and smell the roses may be a tired cliche, but there’s a good reason it’s still so apropos, and overworked! It’s also, not a bad piece of advice on a Monday morning – enjoy being involved in your day.

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