Share

 

For   the    past    few    years,    much    of    the    conversation    within    the    design    community    has    been    how    to    survive    the    economic    downturn.       Designers,  architects,    contractors,    showrooms,    design    centers,    vendors   and    suppliers    have all experienced   this    downturn    in    one    way    or    another.       

    

 

In recent    months    however,    as    we approach    2014,    conversations    have    been    more    positive.        The    reason? The    economy    appears    to    be    growing,    new    housing    starts   are    up    and   buyers are   gobbling    up    properties.   As    business    and    manufacturing    sectors    expand,    so    will   the   need for    design    professionals.    And    according    to    Remodeling    Magazine,    consumers    who   have   long    delayed    even    the    most    essential    of    projects    are    contemplating    what   needs    to    be   done.    

    

 

As    we    look    forward    to    better    times,    and   with   10,000    Baby    Boomers    turning    65    every    day,    the    conversation is    most    timely    about    how    to adapt,    design    and    plan    our home    and    workplace    environments,    and    even    cities    and   towns,    to    accommodate    the   

impact 76    million    Boomers    will   have  over    time.       And    while    those    aging-­‐in-­‐place    

 

concepts are    still    valid,    it    is    time    to    expand    the    conversation.        

 

    

 

To    the   point,    many    who    embraced    age-­‐in-­‐place    concepts,    including    myself,    thought    too    small.    It    isn’t    about   the    design    of spaces    to    accommodate    an    aging   population.        What    it   is    about    is    the    thoughtful    design    of    spaces    and    communities    that   support    the    quality    of    life    -­‐    no    matter    the    years    or mobility.       

    

 

But   the   conversations    need not stop    with    aging    in    place.     

 

    

 

It   is   also    time    for    a    fresh    conversation    about   sustainability.    When    we   think    “green,”    

 

we refer    to    the    design    of environments    that    are    both    sensitive    to    the    use    of    the    


planets resources    and   energy    efficient.    However,    lately green    design has    been    much    more    about    “brand    marketing”,    a    trend    in    building    design    that    is    more    than    just    an    effort    to    reduce    the    impact    on    the    environment.          

    

 

What about    sustaining    the   quality    of    life?       

 

    

 

With those    themes    in    mind,    a    small    group    of    designers,    contractors,    business    associates,    Realtors,    healthcare    professionals   and industry    partners   began    conversations    that    merged    the    elements    of    universal    design    and    aging    in    place   with    sustainable    design    concepts.    

    

 

Those    meetings    led    to   the   creation    of a    new    national    association as    an   advocate    for    change    in   the    design    of    the    built    environment,    a    new    organization    envisioned to    be a    conduit    to:          

                                               -­‐    inform    and    engage    consumers    about    these    ideas,    

 

                                               -­‐        be    a resource    of    information    and    education,    and    

 

                                               -­‐    support    advances    in    the    design    of   both homes    and    communities.     

 

            

 

This new group   is called    the    Design    Alliance    for    Accessible    Sustainable    Environments    (DAASE.)        We    call    it    “Daisy”    for    short.     It    is now    a   registered    501(c)3    non-­‐profit    organization    with    a    rapidly    growing    number    of    members    from    Florida    to    California.       Membership    categories    include    interior    designers,    architects,    contractors,    real estate,    financial    and    healthcare    professionals    as   well    as    consumers    and    other    nonprofit    groups.    

    

 

The   mission   of    DAASE    is    to    inform,    educate    and    advocate    that    which supports    the    quality    of    life    and    to    be an    acknowledged resource    for    consumers    while   providing    thoughtful    leadership    thru,   by    and    for members.    

    

 

In a    few    short    months,    DAASE    has developed    a   robust    website,    a   Facebook    page,    Linked-­‐In    special   interest     page, created    member    marketing    tools,    published    an    


exclusive   home    assessment    guide    and    provided    lectures   and educational    

 

workshops.     

 

        

 

It is   about    an    opportunity    to    change   the    course    of    conversation   within    our    communities    to    inspire    action    by    our    civic    leaders    that    encourages    regulations    that    address    both    environmental    design    and    the    design    of    environments.        

        

 

With “design”    as a    common    denominator    and   developing    partnerships with   others,    the    conversation    in    our    community    can    and    will    evolve    to sustaining    the    quality    of    life    for    all    people,    no    matter    their    location, economic    status,    age,    agility    or   ability.     

    

 

As one    of    the    leaders of    this    new    group,    I    am    excited    about    the    potential    it    has    to    deliver    such    an    important    message    to    consumers    and    to be    able     to create    a    platform    to    bring    together     diverse   groups   of   business    and   design   associates.    For    more    information    about    DAASE,   go    to    the    website:    www.stayinplace.org    or    visit on    Facebook    at    www.facebook.com/StayInPlace    

Leave a Comment